Join this new AVETRA Initiative, the Educator Hub!

What is the Hub?

The Educator Hub is a project to support new VET researchers, VET educators  who have an interest in the use of VET research, and those already involved in research.  It is particularly aimed at those VET educators/practitioners who might be interested in ‘practice-based research or inquiry’.  The Hub is the initiative of a group of AVETRA members who wish to develop research capability more broadly.  Updates and further program details will be put on the website.

The Educator Hub will operate as a national community of practice and provide opportunities for:
*    learning about research and developing research skills
*    networking with other interested VET researchers
*    connecting with experienced AVETRA researchers
*    discussing topical research issues and topics for research
*    foregrounding inquiry as part of practice and providing a practitioner voice to policy

How do you join?

Just click on: avetraeducatorhub.org, and join the activities.  Of course we hope that you will want to join AVETRA overall.  If so, go to membership.

What will I receive for my membership?

Membership of the Hub will provide you with access to:
*    an online platform to link participants nationally and to enable networking, collaboration and     discussion amongst members
*    a series of professional development activities including:
*     webinars and/or Youtube videos featuring expert researchers on topics such as:
*    using research resources on the AVETRA website
*    scholarly activity in VET
*    practice-based research/inquiry and how it works
*    developing research questions and literature reviews
*    presentations by national and international researchers
*    regular professional discussions about specific topics of interest
*    an annual knowledge sharing event that brings participants together.

For further information contact AVETRA, – avetra@theassociationspecialists.com.au or JOIN TODAY

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